CARPE DIEM.

May 14, 2013 | 09:32 AM | 1,624 notes
psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)
May 14, 2013 | 09:30 AM | 132,464 notes
the-absolute-funniest-posts:


This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

May 02, 2013 | 06:08 AM | 312 notes
drmufasa:

yaleuniversity:

Yale School of Medicine researchers have discovered how to measure an infant’s risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his or her placenta at birth.
This allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment for the developmental disorder. The findings are reported in the April 25 online issue of Biological Psychiatry.
Learn more about the discovery on YaleNews →
Illustration: Patrick Lynch

Because we all love Yale Medical :)

drmufasa:

yaleuniversity:

Yale School of Medicine researchers have discovered how to measure an infant’s risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his or her placenta at birth.

This allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment for the developmental disorder. The findings are reported in the April 25 online issue of Biological Psychiatry.

Learn more about the discovery on YaleNews

Illustration: Patrick Lynch

Because we all love Yale Medical :)

(via scienceyoucanlove)

May 02, 2013 | 06:06 AM | 61 notes

scienceyoucanlove:

Listening to Japanese rock and trying to finish this dumb stupid ugly final project, but here, have some Wasser-Bären for good measure.

Was sind Wasser-Bären

May 02, 2013 | 06:05 AM | 1,838 notes

scienceyoucanlove:


It’s a work of art, but it’s not Photoshopped. Using volume rendering of computerised tomography (CT) scans, researchers can visualise shading and shadows to reveal the shape of internal organs and the structure of the bones.

See more of voxel123’s photography here:http://bit.ly/asuxeq

May 02, 2013 | 06:04 AM | 1,964 notes
adventuresinchemistry:

This is adorable! Bohr atoms are definitely the cutest atoms!

adventuresinchemistry:

This is adorable! Bohr atoms are definitely the cutest atoms!

(Source: rhydonmysteelix, via scienceyoucanlove)

May 02, 2013 | 06:03 AM | 77 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

mulishmusings:

scienceyoucanlove:

And a little something to leave with you all as I go off to bed, just in case your arachnophobia hadn’t proliferated enough..
The snake has heat-sensitive pits at either side of its face, which it uses to detect threats — and let’s face it, if you’re close enough for your body heat to be detected, you’re close enough to be considered a threat. Oh, and also what the hell are you doing standing so close to a venomous snake’s face?These heat-sensitive pits are capable of detecting a threatening presence for hours after death, which means the snake may continue to defend itself, zombie-style. And yes, this applies even if the body is no longer attached. So anyone dumb enough to poke and prod it to assess its level of deadness may quickly find themselves with a sudden increase in the level of pissiness of their pants when the snake’s movement sensors kick into action.But don’t worry, it’s not all doom and gloom, because a snake’s venom loses its toxicity after its death. Except that’s a total lie, which means that getting bitten by a dead snake can make you just as dead as getting bitten by a living one, but add to the excruciating pain the severe humiliation, because who the hell loses a fight to a dead animal?
read more here, including a story about a man nearly rebitten by said dead snake and some cool but graphic videos :) 

Actually, I’m sorry but the heat sensitive pits aren’t for threat detection. Sure, they can and sometimes are used for that but in reality they are simply use to gather information about the surrounding environment. In reality, they are more often used for the pinpointing of prey animals and you don’t even have to be that close. In the dark, as many pit vipers are nocturnal, the snake can “see” the heat signature of its prey to strike it. Another aside, while it is true it only takes one strike to envenomate most rattle snakes (at least the common ones in the US) will miss on purpose or initiate a dry bite. There have been multiple studies done on the  unwillingness of rattlers to use venom in their bites, let alone even bite such a large, dangerous creature as ourselves.  Many people walk within an arms length of venomous snakes and never even know it.
As far as biting after dead and envenomating, yes it happens. It is a process of the electrical charges still triggering. I’ve never seen a study that shows it happens often. But I have read more than one anecdote of would be rattle snake hunters and poachers getting grazed by the snake’s fangs long after it is dead and paying the price.
Snakes have a bad enough reputation as it is. They don’t need sensationalized and hyped up facts making it worse.

Sorry, I didn’t meant to misinform or sensationalize. Obviously, I don’t study snakes exclusively, I just wanted to post an article that I found interesting; it has three sources- two of which I trust to a considerable degree so I didn’t at any point consider this to be misinformative. If at anytime I post anything you feel or know is totally off or partially off, don’t hesitate to submit any corrections to me! :) I appreciate it! 

scienceyoucanlove:

mulishmusings:

scienceyoucanlove:

And a little something to leave with you all as I go off to bed, just in case your arachnophobia hadn’t proliferated enough..

The snake has heat-sensitive pits at either side of its face, which it uses to detect threats — and let’s face it, if you’re close enough for your body heat to be detected, you’re close enough to be considered a threat. Oh, and also what the hell are you doing standing so close to a venomous snake’s face?

These heat-sensitive pits are capable of detecting a threatening presence for hours after death, which means the snake may continue to defend itself, zombie-style. And yes, this applies even if the body is no longer attached. So anyone dumb enough to poke and prod it to assess its level of deadness may quickly find themselves with a sudden increase in the level of pissiness of their pants when the snake’s movement sensors kick into action.

But don’t worry, it’s not all doom and gloom, because a snake’s venom loses its toxicity after its death. Except that’s a total lie, which means that getting bitten by a dead snake can make you just as dead as getting bitten by a living one, but add to the excruciating pain the severe humiliation, because who the hell loses a fight to a dead animal?

read more here, including a story about a man nearly rebitten by said dead snake and some cool but graphic videos :) 

Actually, I’m sorry but the heat sensitive pits aren’t for threat detection. Sure, they can and sometimes are used for that but in reality they are simply use to gather information about the surrounding environment. In reality, they are more often used for the pinpointing of prey animals and you don’t even have to be that close. In the dark, as many pit vipers are nocturnal, the snake can “see” the heat signature of its prey to strike it. Another aside, while it is true it only takes one strike to envenomate most rattle snakes (at least the common ones in the US) will miss on purpose or initiate a dry bite. There have been multiple studies done on the  unwillingness of rattlers to use venom in their bites, let alone even bite such a large, dangerous creature as ourselves.  Many people walk within an arms length of venomous snakes and never even know it.

As far as biting after dead and envenomating, yes it happens. It is a process of the electrical charges still triggering. I’ve never seen a study that shows it happens often. But I have read more than one anecdote of would be rattle snake hunters and poachers getting grazed by the snake’s fangs long after it is dead and paying the price.

Snakes have a bad enough reputation as it is. They don’t need sensationalized and hyped up facts making it worse.

Sorry, I didn’t meant to misinform or sensationalize. Obviously, I don’t study snakes exclusively, I just wanted to post an article that I found interesting; it has three sources- two of which I trust to a considerable degree so I didn’t at any point consider this to be misinformative. If at anytime I post anything you feel or know is totally off or partially off, don’t hesitate to submit any corrections to me! :) I appreciate it! 

May 02, 2013 | 06:02 AM | 219 notes
scienceyoucanlove:



HUMAN
Alien-Looking Skeleton Poses Medical Mystery
APR 30, 2013 05:40 PM ET // BY JEANNA BRYNER, LIVESCIENCE MANAGING EDITOR

A teensy skeleton with a squashed alien-like head may have earthly origins, but the remains, found in the Atacama Desert a decade ago, do make for quite a medical mystery.
Apparently when the mummified specimen was discovered, some had suggested the possibility it was an alien that had somehow landed on Earth, though the researchers involved never suggested this otherworldly origin.
PHOTOS: What We Think Martians Look Like
Now, DNA and other tests suggest the individual was a human and was 6 to 8 years of age when he or she died. Even so, the remains were just 6 inches (15 centimeters) long. (See Images of the Alien-Looking Human Remains)
“While the jury is out regarding the mutations that cause the deformity, and there is a real discrepancy in how we account for the apparent age of the bones … every nucleotide I’ve been able to look at is human,” researcher Garry Nolan, professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford School of Medicine, told LiveScience. “I’ve only scratched the surface in the analysis. But there is nothing that jumps out so far as to scream ‘nonhuman.’”
Analyzing the tiny human
Nolan and his colleagues analyzed the specimen in the fall of 2012 with high-resolution photography, X-rays and computed tomography scans, as well as DNA sequencing. The researchers wanted to find out whether some rare disorder could explain the anomalous skeleton — for instance it had just 10 ribs as opposed to 12 in a healthy human — the age the organism died, as its size suggested a preterm fetus, stillborn or a deformed child, and whether it was human or perhaps a South American nonhuman primate.
The remains also showed skull deformities and mild underdevelopment of the mid-face and jaw, the researchers found. The skull also showed signs of turricephaly, or high-head syndrome, a birth defect in which the top of the skull is cone-shaped.
The genome sequencing suggested the creature was human, though 9 percent of the genes didn’t match up with the reference human genome; the mismatches may be due to various factors, including degradation, artifacts from lab preparation of the specimen or insufficient data.
source and source for photos

scienceyoucanlove:

Alien-Looking Skeleton Poses Medical Mystery

// 

A teensy skeleton with a squashed alien-like head may have earthly origins, but the remains, found in the Atacama Desert a decade ago, do make for quite a medical mystery.

Apparently when the mummified specimen was discovered, some had suggested the possibility it was an alien that had somehow landed on Earth, though the researchers involved never suggested this otherworldly origin.

PHOTOS: What We Think Martians Look Like

Now, DNA and other tests suggest the individual was a human and was 6 to 8 years of age when he or she died. Even so, the remains were just 6 inches (15 centimeters) long. (See Images of the Alien-Looking Human Remains)

“While the jury is out regarding the mutations that cause the deformity, and there is a real discrepancy in how we account for the apparent age of the bones … every nucleotide I’ve been able to look at is human,” researcher Garry Nolan, professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford School of Medicine, told LiveScience. “I’ve only scratched the surface in the analysis. But there is nothing that jumps out so far as to scream ‘nonhuman.’”

Analyzing the tiny human

Nolan and his colleagues analyzed the specimen in the fall of 2012 with high-resolution photography, X-rays and computed tomography scans, as well as DNA sequencing. The researchers wanted to find out whether some rare disorder could explain the anomalous skeleton — for instance it had just 10 ribs as opposed to 12 in a healthy human — the age the organism died, as its size suggested a preterm fetus, stillborn or a deformed child, and whether it was human or perhaps a South American nonhuman primate.

The remains also showed skull deformities and mild underdevelopment of the mid-face and jaw, the researchers found. The skull also showed signs of turricephaly, or high-head syndrome, a birth defect in which the top of the skull is cone-shaped.

The genome sequencing suggested the creature was human, though 9 percent of the genes didn’t match up with the reference human genome; the mismatches may be due to various factors, including degradation, artifacts from lab preparation of the specimen or insufficient data.

May 02, 2013 | 06:01 AM | 6,368 notes
May 01, 2013 | 11:06 PM | 17,641 notes
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